Another surf update, this time from NZ A Group A! Liz one of the instructors gives us the low-down on what they've been up to lately:

After a six hour drive from Byron Bay we arrived at Surfari—our accommodations in Crescent Head, New South Wales. After a week of living out of tents it was lovely to sleep on real beds. The relaxation didn’t last long, because the next morning we drove to Plomer Beach for our first day of service work. With a view of the waves crashing on the cliff next to us, we pulled, sawed, and poisoned the roots of an invasive plant species called Bitou Bush.

On the third day of conservation work, we planted species that were native to the region in order to restore the balance of the ecosystem.

After 3 days of saving the earth we were ready to start surfing. We rode with our surf instructors, Ben and JJ, in a van with almost fifteen surfboards on the rack. We stopped at several beaches to check out the waves, but our main surf spot ended up being Plomer Beach. 

We headed out to sea with our freshly waxed boards ready to shred some gnar. Catching that first wave was the best feeling in the world. Those who were more experienced or confident than others paddled farther out for bigger waves, while others caught waves closer to the shore with JJ pushing their boards. No matter the skill level, everyone stood up at least once, and everyone had a blast. Getting bonked on the head by the odd runaway foam board didn’t stop us from appreciating the beauty in front of us!

The dolphins were surfing the same waves we did, manta rays were gliding just below the surface, and sea turtles were popping their heads out for air while hunting the aforementioned jellyfish. Amazing!

At the end of the week our arms were exhausted but we were ready to keep moving forward on our adventure.

If you want to learn more about the New Zealand and Australia Semester Program, you can read more here.

 

 

 

 

 


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Author Pacific Discovery Outreach Posted